Posts Tagged ‘Electronica’

Eight days after a Guardian interview belatedly introduced me to the works of iamamiwhoami I still cannot make sense of it all. Thus instead of weaving a non-too-clever story around the facts, I shall merely go forth and present them in list format:

1) iamamiwhoami is a multimedia entity/audiovisual/viral marketing project

2) iamamiwhoami is a Swedish-born concept fronted by Jonna Lee

3) iamamiwhoami debuted on YouTube in December 2009

4) iamamiwhoami videos predominantly feature Lee prancing around in snow-white skimpies, oddly-behaving yeti creatures and an even more baffling range of imagery and symbols

5) iamamiwhoami is addictive

Out of these five nuggets of information, the second was the last to come to light. Not until iamamiwhoami’s twelfth video ‘t‘ was singer-songwriter Lee unmasked from sellotape & black make-up (amongst other things) and crowned as the face of the project. Up to that point fans had been agonisingly drip-fed video releases on a fortnightly basis beginning with the mysteriously encoded first sequence Prelude 699130082.451322-5.4.21.3.1.20.9.15.14.1.12.

Prelude proved something of a phenomenon, arousing wild speculation and amassing as of today, knocking-on 350,000 views. Was Gaga behind the strange 55-second clip that featured human limbs protruding from trees? Or could it be Aguilera, Little Boots even?

Following on its heels was 9.1.13.669321018, appearing to show a tree exuding semen. In total, the first six clips followed a similar theme with their numerically-encrypted titles and each containing an animal symbol ranging from owls to llamas. Very clever teasers.

The next six video titles combined to spell “b-o-u-n-t-y”. Finally, nine videos have been released in the last six months that could signal iamamiwhoami’s evolution into a (slightly) more conventional artist. My favourite however, Clump, is excluded. No prizes for guessing what the subtleties in this video signify.

 

Quit with the history and describe the music itself I hear you cry! Well… in all honestly, it’s insignificant, forgettable, wishy-washy, amniotic electronic waves if you like. One thing that does need to be grasped is that iamamiwhoami music plays second fiddle, the visuals are what makes it all a little special.

Two hours on from when I started writing this article and I’m more confused than ever. So, to avoid the onset of madness, migraine and other maladies I shall leave you to make your own mind up on iamamiwhoami. The debut album kin will be released on 3rd September on Co-operative Music, an independent label – big up! Save your money though, you’re better off watching the YouTube videos. ABsorbing!

TheLeicester act, now officially a quintet, opened with Days Are Forgotten and finished by dishing up a feathery serving ofVelociraptor!.

Also performing on Later with Jools last night was rapper Jermaine Scott AKA Wretch 32. Wretch hit fame for his Example of Unorthodox ways and his equally controversial comments made during the July riots. “Wish I was there” Scott tweeted, referring to the Tottenham riots, staged in protest to the police shooting of Mark Duggan. Most would agree that Scott’s statement was Wretchedly mistimed/miscalculated. Little did he know the events that night would spark nationwide looting and infernos.

Here Wretch releases a different kind of verbal volley in the form of Don’t Go, the number single featuring  Josh Kumra. It’s not bad either; a bit wet, a bit camp but not a bit bad. Pajama Club also caught the eye with their groovy effort Tell Me What You Want.

Watch Jools, series 39 episode 2 here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b015fjym/Later_Live…_with_Jools_Holland_Series_39_Episode_2/

Velociraptor! – the fourth album produced by Kasabian was released yesterday. By no means is it a dinosaur of an album, but neither does it suggest the Leicester band’s success is heading towards extinction.

First questions first: the name? According to lead vocalist Tom Meighan the album is so titled because “it’s a cool word… Latin… prehistoric”. Meighan has clearly done his background for Velociraptor means ‘fast hunter’ in the language of the Romans. And it surely won’t be long before Kasabian’s burgeoning fanbase pounce on this latest effort and propel it to the top of the album charts.

Contrary to what you would expect from an album named after a reptile, Velociraptor! doesn’t take long to warm up. Let’s Roll Just Like We Used To is an intriguing opening track as it totally contradicts the classic Kasabian song formula. At times it echoes of Last Shadow Puppets‘ orchestral pop, far removed from their typical electronica overtones. Following in this vein are La Fee Verte and Goodbye Kiss, where it’s surprising to hear Meighan, a caged tiger of a live performer, singing about love. “I hope someday that we meet again” he purrs over tambourine clatters in the 60’s-belonging ballad. 

The sharply-named pre-release Switchblade Smiles reverts more to type, relying on a heavy assortment of bass which parallels Club Foot. In fact it’s so similar to that  it could well be the same song played backwards. Still it’s catchy enough for FIFA 12. It also features on Match of the Day 2, something which will please guitarist Serge Pizzorno – a decent footballer in his prime. Remember this?

New single Days are Forgotten lacks the creativity of a typical Kasabian number and is consequently staler than a week-old loaf of bread. BBC Breakfast presenter Sian Williams compares the #28 single to the OK Computer days of Radiohead which the band gratefully accept as a “huge compliment. Personally I count that as an admission of a 4 minute durge.

Title track Velociraptor! adds pace and bite to proceedings with a clever riff and an explosive, comical chorus of “Velociraptor, he’s gonna find yer, he’s gonna kill yer, he’s gonna eat yer”. Elsewhere Re-wired reacquaints with the space rock genre while Acid Turkish Bath with its Arabian influences wouldn’t be out of place in a desert crossing of a Middle Eastern film.

After playing with Fire in West Ryder… Kasabian show here that they have plenty of other tricks in their act. Songwriter Pizzorno describes it as a “jukebox record”. I wouldn’t advise skipping through any of this selection.